Planned Parenthood Action Fund of New Jersey

New Jersey Women's Health is At Risk

Right now, our champions in the New Jersey State Legislature are supporting efforts toIcon.png expand access to women's health care. Speak out today, and ask your legislators to support access to quality, affordable reproductive health care for all New Jerseyans.

In 2010, Governor Christie eliminated $7.5 million for preventative family planning services from the state budget. This funding went to services like lifesaving cancer screenings, birth control, prevention and treatment of STIs, breast health services, Pap tests, and other health screenings. Six years later, that is nearly $45 million that has not been available to invest in keeping New Jersey families healthy.

Women's health is at risk in New Jersey:  

  • Rates of sexually transmitted infections have increased more than 27% since funding for family planning services was cut from the state budget, and in one-third of New Jersey counties, the rate is nearly 50 percent or above. Sexually transmitted infections, if left untreated, can lead to serious health issues, like infertility and certain types of cancer. Having an STI can also increase chances of getting HIV.
  • More than 1.1 million women in NJ are in need of contraceptive services and supplies, and nearly 40% are in need of contraception that is publicly funded, a 5% increase since 2010. The ability to plan, prevent, and space pregnancies is directly linked to benefits to women, men, children, and society, including more educational and economic opportunities, healthier babies, more stable families, and a reduced taxpayer burden. 
  • More than 38,000 individuals are living with HIV/AIDS statewide, and 4 out of 5 women with HIV/AIDS in NJ are women of color. 
  • In 2012, there were more than 4,700 births to teen mothers and more than 7,400 new breast and cervical cancer cases.
     
  • Although more New Jersey residents have health insurance coverage thanks to the Affordable Care Act, nearly 295,000 women of reproductive age (15-49) were uninsured in NJ in 2015.   

Women and families across New Jersey need your help. Tell your legislators that you support efforts to restore and expand access to reproductive health care.

o    Rates of sexually transmitted infections have increased more than 27% since funding for family planning services was cut from the state budget.

      • Sexually transmitted infections, if left untreated, can lead to serious health issues, like infertility and certain types of cancer. Having an STI can also increase chances of getting HIV.

 

o    More than 1.1 million women in NJ are in need of contraceptive services and supplies, and nearly 40% are in need of contraception that is publicly funded, a 5% increase since 2010.

      • Birth control is basic health care for women: The average woman will spend about 30 years of her life trying to avoid pregnancy. Millions of women have used birth control to plan their families, finish their education, and pursue their dreams.

      • The ability to plan, prevent, and space pregnancies is directly linked to benefits to women, men, children, and society, including more educational and economic opportunities, healthier babies, more stable families, and a reduced taxpayer burden. 

 

o    More than 38,000 individuals are living with HIV/AIDS statewide, and 4 out of 5 women with HIV/AIDS in NJ are women of color.

 

o    More than 37,000 bacterial STIs were diagnosed in 2014, an increase of more than 27% since funding for family planning services was cut from the state budget.

 

o    More than 4,700 births to teen mothers and more than 7,400 new breast and cervical cancer cases in 2012.

Recipients

  • Your State Senator or Senators
  • Your State Representative or Representatives

Contact

*Required fields
 
 

Message

Dear [Decision Maker],

Sincerely,
[Your Name]
[Your Address]
[City, State ZIP]